Friday, October 16, 2009

Stop playing with yourself and watch this

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

Before I got dizzy I decided what it meant was I should find a Chinese Love Slave and move to Bermuda.

RJ

Erin O'Brien said...

I thought it meant that I should immediately buy a newfangled pair of benwa balls.

Anonymous said...

So what does it all mean? Just because "unique" information gets generated doesn't mean it's relevant. There has been a tradeoff for this barrage of information.

On another note, I have a book (and author) to recommend to you Erin. Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace. DFW can take a nanosecond and describe it in such detail you'll spend two hours and five footnotes reading. A truly outstanding and ambitious piece of work. I don't know how I missed it over the last ten years but I am totally engrossed in it now.

Anonymous said...

Sorry, I wote that above. jemison

dean said...

That was pretty cool.

We live in exponential times, it says. Well, we have always lived in exponential times. Human growth has always been exponential, it's just that we started small.

It makes me wish I could live to 200, 300 years old. Not because I'm afraid of dying (I am!) but because I want to see what the world will look like. It will be so different at the end of my life than it was at the beginning.

LimesNow said...

A sales wonk came into my office a time or ten trying to sell me TV ads at a discount. I finally agreed to give him 20 minutes of my time. When he came back, he spent 5 of the 20 minutes showing me this clip. It had nothing to do with me buying TV ads, but it was a nice, irrelevant diversion in the day. I sure hope it's working for him as a TV ad-selling tool.

Tag said...

The health wonks say that people born in in this century will have an average age of 100. Not taking into consideration climate change.
Whats tomorrow's version of my space?

Shaina said...

things like this scare me. i don't want to live more than *maybe* 90 years, because i really don't think i want to see where we'll be in 2087 (when i would be 100). scares the shit out of me.

if i can manage it, my kids will not be allowed on a computer until they are at least 6 years old. i might even send them to Montessori schools, where they don't introduce computers til around fourth grade i think. we shall see.

Amy L. Hanna said...

After a minute and 27 seconds of that - and since I'm one of those people who's been paying attention - I kinda don't need anymore "stats" ...

Kirk Jusko said...

Yeah?! Well, what about the flying cars?! The Jetsons promised us flying cars!

Incidentally, that presentation didn't mention an end to poverty, crime, war, or broken hearts. Some things we're stuck with for the long run.

Onan said...

I read the title of this post, and, I'm sorry, but...

Once known as The Badger said...

As Walter in The Big Lebowski says, "I did not know that, Dude!"

Hal said...

I agree with Onan. Nothing will make me stop playing with myself.

Anonymous said...

Hal, you do know who Onan was don't you...jemison

Satan said...

ive made it possible for you to play with yourself at the same time as you watch this kind of garbage

quit fighting eob

Harry Finch said...

...full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Bridget Callahan said...

I liked it. However I may never forgive you for making me listen to that song again.

jonas said...

When I suggested using this clip for my engineering student, one of my co-teachers has this to say:

"Nice video, it shows some interesting things. But I worry that we'd be reinforcing the idea that history is a linear progression, and that technology does mean progress. What do you think?"

She's spot on. "Future = technology = progress" is a very 19-20th century thought. This video isn't quite nuanced enough to suggest otherwise.

jonas said...

Let me be more clear: the video doesnt suggest that such a formula might not be true.

Kirk Jusko said...

Jonas, I would say our current environmental problems are stem from Future = Technology = Progress.

Incidentally, Tom Wolfe said in an essay about 20 years ago that the 21st century would be the 20th century's hangover. That technogical progress would slow down, even come to a halt, as we dealt with the excesses of the past. I don't know. We're moving towards a "green" society when it comes to the old stuff, but some of the biggerst enthusiasts for the new stuff are environmentalists like Al Gore. Who's to say there's not a cyber equivalent to global warrming lurking in these computers were using that we won't find out about for another 50 years?

jonas said...

Kirk,

I think you are, give or take, about 200% right re: environmental issues.

For those interested, check out the works of Prof. Leo Marx from MIT. Specifically, his book on "technological determinism."

Stephanie said...

We watched this video in Social Media class! It is crazy to think how fast our economy and technology is growing. To think that there will be jobs in 2010 that didn't exist just a couple of years ago scares me a little. Keeping up with this rapid movement is a challenge, but I think I'm ready to face it! How did you feel when you watched this video?

Erin O'Brien said...

I thought it was stunning in a gimmicky sort of way.

Think of the word google. It was nonsensical just a few years ago, now we all know exactly what it means. So strange.

Kirk Jusko said...

Google comes from "googal" which is a 1 followed by a hundred zeroes.

Either that or it was named for a character that hasn't been seen in the comic strip "Barney Google and Snuffy Smith" for over 60 years.

Or it was named after a string of nightclubs here in NE Ohio in the '70s and '80s.

Take your pick.

Lonster said...

Ok, all the facts at the beginning, show a lack of perspective.

The top 25% of India's students, for example, just says they've got 4x as many people, not how their top 25% compares to anything.

The broadband penetration one cracked me up, too. So, Bermuda! How much infrastructure does it take to cover 20 square miles with Broadband? Seriously.

If MySpace were a country, there would probably only be about 50Million people in it, it's just that some of them carry 15-20 different ID cards.

Today's Learner...Suppose that means, 15-year old. I know I had about 10 different jobs before I graduated college, does that count?

Then there's a whole bunch of speculation based on past performance, which doesn't really need a comment.

And yet, batteries are still just metal and acid. What's up with that?