Monday, April 19, 2010

Vit-O-Might or Might I vite?

Dear CNN,

I read the following paragraph in your vitamin article:
"The Puerto Rican study, which was not published in a peer-reviewed journal, looked at the capacity of DNA to repair itself in the face of damage. A low DNA repair capacity has previously been linked to cancer risk, said Jaime Matta at the Ponce School of Medicine. Researchers surveyed 268 breast cancer patients and 457 healthy controls and took samples from them to analyze their DNA repair capacity."

If you paid me one million dollars, I could not tell you what any of that means. Thusly discouraged, I did not read the rest of the article very closely, but I think I'm supposed to move to Japan or Sweden and eat a lot of broccoli.

Whatever is contained in the article, you will likely disapprove of the amount of vitamins I take.



I took that video three years ago and have since run out of vitamins. Fortunately for me, my vitamin company is running another sale.

That is all.

* * *

18 comments:

Bill said...

If one wants to decrease his chances of getting cancer or other life threatening illness, one must choose his parents more carefully.

Erin O'Brien said...

Bill, that sure gave me a smile. Thanks.

Chrissy said...

HOLY........!...LOL....Its a heck of a lot easier to eat right...lol... btw can u smell the potency of those vitamins on your breath? lol.....(and yes, I realize this was tongue and cheeky of ya)...

Judy said...

Where to you store all them? Do you take them all before the expiration date? I'm an advocate of vitamins also...but I try not to buy too many at a time as I'm always changing which vitamins I take depending on what I'm reading at the time...

Erin O'Brien said...

Chrissy: I suppose I do have Vit-A-Breath. eek!

Judy: Perhaps it is sad to admit that no, I've never let a vitamin expire.

Ken Houghton said...

Translations:

"which was not published in a peer-reviewed journal" = No one who works in the field believes them, no one was asked to verify their result (or, if asked, could not verify them)

"A low DNA repair capacity has previously been linked to cancer risk"

This is supposed to suggest that their study that no one believes is good for something.

"Researchers surveyed 268 breast cancer patients and 457 healthy controls and took samples from them to analyze their DNA repair capacity"

This is trying to make it look as if they did a lot of work. But they don't say what samples or what controls were used. (See first point above.)

Whether it should be worrisome that they took samples from so many more "control" subjects than breast cancer patients is left as an exercise, but certainly would raise a red flag in economics.

Erin O'Brien said...

Thank you Mr. Houghton for the clarification. I shall now go sample myself.

Amy L. Hanna said...

utoton sez:

These inconclusive vitamin studies are just fodder for news filler, like all those contradictory studies for things like coffee, oral contraceptives, or the still disputed dangers of cell phone use - ad nauseam. And given that overly rehashed piece of discussion comes from CNN, I'm especially not surprised. Next!

Once Known as The Badger said...

I hear excessive vitamin consumption causes cancer of the megalocampus system of the lower thalmyrigor region...

Matt Conlon said...

"In a study we did someplace where the government was not likely to be interested in our results, we found that the DNA's ability to resist extreme heat was directly linked to the severity of a burn when the body was held over a camp fire.

We surveyed at least a dozen people who have been badly burnt, and as it turns out, their DNA's ability to resist severe burns was low.

That is all."

For crying out loud! Imagine that, cancer grows well in hosts who have a low ability to repair their own DNA? Give them a freakin medal.

Matt Conlon said...

CNN Exec: "Boy, we're short on material..."

CNN Reporter: "Well, I DO have this story about DNA and it's repair capacity, but I haven't checke..."

CNN Exec: "Perfect! Run it! Just make sure you disown any responsibility for accuracy in the first paragraph!"

Sorry for second post so soon... couldn't resist.

Chrissy said...

Erin, I had a friend who took potent supplements and he would say it made him burp.. and when he burped, well, he said it was pretty potent! lol

Bill said...

I have nothing else to say but the word verification word is PALIN (seriously) and I didn't want to waste it since I knew you, Erin, would love that.

LimesNow said...

Oh, god, Erin ~ you're talking to one. I rattle when I walk! Sometimes I substitute the vitamins for a meal. :~{ That is a womanly vitamin haul you shared.

Anonymous said...

Being the resident old codger I date back to Linus Pauling and Megadosing Vitamin C. However I thought it was finally determined that the body absorbs small quantities and the excess is passed in urine, rendering most supplements superfluous. What am I missing?

RJ

Erin O'Brien said...

Amy: It's chock full o' filler, indeed.

Badger: Please watch your language, young man.

Matt: "Conlon, I like the way you think!"

Chrissy: Vitamin burps are the absolute worst.

Bill: That silly little broad will dog me one way or another until the day I die.

Limes: You and I are going to live to be 125, I tell you!

RJ: You're not missing anything. What am I missing?

LimesNow said...

Erin, even though I will reach age 125 quite awhile before you do,I submit that each of us will still be cuties at that age. I hope we'll NOT have outlived our daughers, in their 90s by then. I submit the Badger will still be emitting snarky talk at that time, even though fully 3 years older than I.

That is all. WV = hotingst. Need I say one word more?

Anonymous said...

Hey you were kind of cute back in the day.